Home News Local News Texas Unemployment Rate Goes Up in September

Texas Unemployment Rate Goes Up in September

254
0

Area County Rates also Increase 

By Will Johnson              

Messenger Reporter

EAST TEXAS – According to an Oct. 16 press release from the Texas Workforce Commission, “The Texas unemployment rate rose to 8.3 percent in September, after dipping from the high of 13.5 percent in April 2020 when the peak of COVID-19 impacts occurred.”

Last month, the unemployment rate in Texas was 6.8 percent while a year ago it was 3.5 percent.  

The TWC statement indicated the increase was likely due to “… a shrinking civilian labor force as the number of individuals actively looking for work contracted, while the unemployed rose.”

Statewide, the highest unemployment level recorded was 13.2 percent, in the Odessa Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) areas.

An MSA is defined as a “… free-standing metropolitan area composed of one or more counties.”

The lowest rate, at 5.1 percent, was in the Amarillo MSA. The nearest regional MSA is in the Tyler area which came in at 7.2 percent for the month of September.  

Just like the state numbers, the unemployment rates for the contiguous counties of Houston County all showed an increase over the month-to-month timeframe. 

In Houston County, the unemployment rate for September showed an increase as it went from 4.6 percent in August to 5.8 percent last month. The September 2020 unemployment rate was also higher than the September 2019 rate of three percent.

The unemployment rate in Anderson County also jumped up as it went from 5.3 percent in August to 6.5 percent in September. The September 2020 unemployment rate was also higher than the 2.7 percent rate posted in September 2019.

To the south – in Trinity County – the month-to-month rate increased as it went from 7.6 percent in August to 9.3 percent in September. The September 2020 unemployment rate was also significantly higher than the 4.6 percent rate posted in September 2019.

The September unemployment rate in Cherokee County also increased as it went from 7.6 percent in August to 9.5 percent last month. The September 2020 unemployment rate was also significantly higher than the 3.7 percent rate posted in September 2019.

The largest population center in the immediate area, Angelina County, also saw the unemployment rate rise as it went from seven percent in August to 8.6 percent in September. The September 2020 unemployment rate was significantly higher than the 3.9 percent rate posted in September 2019.

On a month-to-month basis, in Leon County, the statistical data indicated an increase from 6.7 percent in August to 8.2 percent in September. The September 2020 unemployment rate was also significantly higher than the 4.5 percent rate posted in September 2019.

Madison County also saw an increase in the unemployment rate as it went from 6.8 percent in August to 8.5 percent in September. The September 2020 unemployment rate was significantly higher than the 4.4 percent rate posted in September 2019.

Rounding out the area counties, Walker County continued the trend as it saw the unemployment rate go from 6.7 percent in August to 8.1 percent in September. The September 2020 unemployment rate was also significantly higher than the 3.8 percent rate posted in September 2019.

In the aforementioned press release from the Texas Workforce Commission, TWC Chairman Bryan Daniel stated, “Despite the increase in the overall unemployment rate, Texas had a net gain in jobs for September. TWC continues to implement tools to spur additional job growth as a critical part of our efforts to grow the state’s economy.”

In September, according to the TWC media briefing, “The Leisure and Hospitality sector added 23,600 jobs, Government added 5,400 jobs and Professional and Business Services added 4,000 jobs.”

TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez stated, “TWC offers numerous resources to Texans looking for work or building their careers. Local Workforce Solutions offices around the state can help job seekers with resumes, job preparation and determining their career path.”

Will Johnson may be contacted via e-mail at wjohnson@messenger-news.com.   

Please follow and like us: