By Will Johnson
Messenger Reporter

CROCKETT – A Crockett man was arrested and charged with five felonies and three misdemeanors after an incident on Saturday, Feb. 4 where he allegedly slammed into a patrol unit while he attempted to evade law enforcement officials.

Jarvis Tremain McCullough, 35, was booked into custody on charges of: aggravated assault of a public servant; evading arrest or detention with a vehicle; two counts of possession of a controlled substance; felony possession of a firearm; theft of a firearm; resisting arrest; and possession of marijuana.

McCullough’s arrest stemmed from a report of loud music coming from a vehicle parked in front of Margie’s Club, located at 200 E. Bell Ave. Corporal Todd Little and Officer Bray Walter with the Crockett Police Department were dispatched to the location and when they arrived they “… could hear loud music coming from a 2008 Chrysler 300 that was parked in front of the club,” according to an arrest report.

The officers parked their patrol unit behind the Chrysler and approached the vehicle “… to make contact with the driver, and only occupant, later identified as Jarvis McCullough,” the report stated.

As the officers approached the vehicle, the arrest report indicated they detected a strong odor of marijuana. The police officers requested McCullough to roll down his window but according to the arrest report, McCullough opened the driver’s side door, closed it, put the car in reverse and slammed into the CPD patrol unit.

Cpl. Little retreated to the patrol unit and prepared to initiate a vehicle chase, but the report indicated, “McCullough then pulled forward and then back again and then forward.”

“Cpl. Little then approached the Chrysler, opened the driver’s door and pulled McCullough out,” the report stated.

After the officers were able to control McCullough, the report stated a search was conducted which yielded “… several items from his pockets that included a large bundle of money totaling $885 and a plastic container that had a white rocky substance believed to be crack cocaine. It later field tested positive for cocaine and weighed 1.2 grams.”

A search of the Chrysler driven by McCullough yielded a Smith and Wesson 9mm pistol – which had previously been reported as stolen – a container with marijuana and a bag containing three pills identified as hydrocodone, the report stated.

McCullough was transported to the Houston County Jail and was booked into custody on a total of eight criminal offenses. Among the aforementioned charges, the aggravated assault of a public servant offense is considered as a first degree felony.

According to Section 12.32 of the Texas Penal Code, “An individual adjudged guilty of a felony of the first degree shall be punished by imprisonment in the institutional division for life or for any term of not more than 99 years or less than five years. In addition to imprisonment, an individual adjudged guilty of a felony of the first degree may be punished by a fine not to exceed $10,000.”

The evading arrest, cocaine possession and felony firearm possession offenses are considered third degree felonies.

According to Section 12.34 of the Texas Penal Code, “An individual adjudged guilty of a felony of the third degree shall be punished by imprisonment in the institutional division for any term of not more than 10 years or less than two years. In addition to imprisonment, an individual adjudged guilty of a felony of the third degree may be punished by a fine not to exceed $10,000.”

The theft of a firearm charge is considered a state jail felony.

According to Section 12.35 of the Texas Penal Code, “An individual adjudged guilty of a state jail felony shall be punished by confinement in a state jail for any term of not more than two years or less than 180 days. In addition to confinement, an individual adjudged guilty of a state jail felony may be punished by a fine not to exceed $10,000.”

The resisting arrest and possession of hydrocodone offense are considered Class A misdemeanors.

According to Section 12.21 of the Texas Penal Code, “An individual adjudged guilty of a Class A misdemeanor shall be punished by a fine not to exceed $4,000; confinement in jail for a term not to exceed one year; or both such fine and confinement.”

The possession of marijuana charge is considered a Class B misdemeanor.

According to Section 12.22 of the Texas Penal Code, “An individual adjudged guilty of a Class B misdemeanor shall be punished by a fine not to exceed $2,000; confinement in jail for a term not to exceed 180 days; or both such fine and confinement.”

McCullough is held at the Houston County Jail on a total bond of $188,000.

Will Johnson may be contacted via e-mail at wjohnson@messenger-news.com.